May 20, 2018:

Hola!

Yesterday Prince Harry married American Meghan Markle and I couldn't get enough of the royal wedding. What a gorgeous dress, the bride was radiantly beautiful and the church at Windsor - oh my goodness, the flowers alone were soooo beautiful. There's nothing like a good love story to make one appreciate how precious we can be (and should be) to each other.

I'm glad the weather was perfect yesterday for the new Duke and Duchess of Sussex's wedding. I can't say the same for around here. Spring keeps teasing and then going away. This morning I woke up to a "balmy" 47 degrees F outside, rain, damp, and I turned the heat back on! It's May 20th, the heat. should. not. be. on. Period.

Last Thursday, however, was beautiful. I was able to get a goodly amount of yard and garden clean-up done over several days last week. I also took some photos of my flowering tree anchoring the north corner of my house and made the current collage. I think it's an ornamental cherry, and on the the other end of the house, I think that's called a purple sand cherry? I'll have to check that. The blossoms on the tree do not have a distinct fragrance, but the purple shrub that wants to be a tree (despite my hacking it back, back and back yearly - I'm losing, by the way) has myriad blossoms with a distinct fragrance. I can't decide if the scent is too beautiful to bear or too awful to smell, it certainly can be overpowering!

This coming week will be the third cut of the grass this season. We had rain late Friday night and then for several hours earlier this morning. This rain, on top of the rain we had over four days the prior weekend, and the grass is growing like nobody's business! I don't mind doing the grass, though, as long as it's not too hot, too cold, not raining, and not too windy. I'm not picky at all, am I...

I still have a lot of raking out of areas that suffered from snow mold over the winter, and have not yet really tackled cleaning out the north flower bed in the backyard. That will be a chore!

But Memorial Day weekend is coming. This coming Saturday I will be out with a friend (who has a nice large van - goody!) stocking up on potting soil, top soil to fill in never-ending low spots in the yard, grass seed, and lots of plants! For some reason, this spring seems busier than those in prior years. I can't figure out why that is...

Jan

Sunday, October 20, 2013

The Look for Less: Traditional Home Visits Designer Joseph Abboud -- Part 5

Hola everyone!

I'm hoping to duplicate the feeling (if not the imagery) of the horse painting above the fireplace in Joseph Abboud's living room. 



The print edition of the magazine described:  A Roberto Dutesco photograph of horses creates a focal point at a console table supported by neoclassical columns.  But, it isn't the right painting!  Another horsely image holds center place in the dining room, a painting by Jeffrey Terreson. But it isn't the right painting, either. I could find no mention of the artwork above the fireplace either in the print magazine or at the Traditional Home website, so I don't know who created it or if it is a print or painting.

As you know, horses are tres popular these days and have been for awhile now.  I started seeing them crop up in decorating blogs months to a year ago.  As a chessplayer, I understand the fascination with horses in, perhaps, a more tactile manner.  They have an ancient connection to the game.  As a romantic, I understand the amazing, nearly telepathic bond that can develop between such a magnificent animal and his or her human.  As an historian, I appreciate the long relationship that mankind has had with equines.  The earliest evidence of man domesticating horses in some form or other dates back nearly 8,000 years.  In fact, that word - equine - is from the Latin equinus, from equus, horse.  That rather begs the question, though, because of course there was language BEFORE LATIN (B.L.).  Latin is one of the branches of the Indo-European language family from which many languages have descended, including the so-called "romance" languages and ancient written Sanskrit in which the earliest Hindu legends and myths were recorded thousands of years later.  A linguistic reconstruction of the original word for horse in the earliest form of Indo-European, called "proto-Indo-European" (or PIE) says it is something like ekhwos.   Our English word, horse, comes from Old English hors, which comes from the Old High German hros.  I can definitely see the ancient linguistic link between ekhwos and horse

I find all of this absolutely fascinating but you're probably bored to tears. My goal is to find something  reasonably priced, and I do not mean a giclee print costing $300 or more!  They seem to be everywhere these days:

Home Decorators:  by Liz Jardine, Steed Wall Art, a very large 40" x 50", $379

Home Decorators: by Sofia Fox, Winter Stallion Wall Art, 40" x 40", $355

Home Decorators: by Sofia Fox, Tribute Wall Art, 40" x 40", $$355

There are lots more giclee at Home Decorators, but you get the point.  Those prints are beautiful, and large, but too expensive for my miniscule budget.  And, since it's Home Decorators, I did not think it likely I'd find comparable prints at other popular shopping sites for lower prices. 

Soooooo, I looked for posters.  I know they're not everyone's cup of tea, but for the price and spacial impact they can make they're hard to beat when one is on a budget. 

This poster caught my fancy.  From allposters.com, it's called Whoa Slow Down, an art print by John Saunders (42" x 32", $83.99):


The individual expressions on the horses' faces are priceless and the color tones are neutral, but there's lots of spirit and action in the print, nonetheless.  Unframed, it's got a 2" border around. 

Art prints are created on paper similar to that of a postcard or greeting card using a digital or offset lithography press.  allposters.com offers many options, including having this print on canvas (40" x 30" would be $219.99, other sizes available), or a 42" x 32" wood mount for $197.99 (with border); $184.99 with border trimmed, other sizes available.  About wood mount:   thick piece of beveled hardboard for a clean and sleek style. Made from high-quality materials for durability, the art is finished with a protective UV coating. You can buy them framed, too (pricey -- I think you can do it yourself for less).

This Black Beauty (who hasn't read that classic book as a girl?) at art.com spoke to me:



Lepa Zena print by Marta Gottfried.  The 40" x 30" art print is on sale right now for $64.99 (reduced by $5).  Art.com offers all kinds of different canvas and framing options.

The print above the fireplace (photo above) looks large.  Finding a poster that approaches the same size - not so easy.  For instance, check out this poster I found at Amazon:

The Dance Wild Horses Animal Poster Print 24 x 36 inches
$16.95

Framing this beautiful poster with a nice border and large frame to fill in the space above a mantel would be costly, but I'm thinking still half less than one of the glicee prints from Home Decorators. 

Here is another 24 x 36 inches print, Horse Trio by Robert Dawson, 31.45: 

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